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FORCE2018 at McGill University on October 11-12, 2018 – with pre-conference workshops on Oct 10 hosted at Concordia University
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Wednesday, October 10
 

9:00am

Research published over the last week
All pre-conference workshops required separate registration. That registration process is now CLOSED and this workshop is full.  

With thousands of research publications coming out each day, it is hard to keep or even get an overview. I will provide a guided tour around research from various fields that was published over the week prior to the session, highlighting (i) how to find such publications, (ii) what can be learned from them in such a short time span, (iii) how to engage with them and (iv) lessons that authors, readers, publishers and others involved in scholarly communication can draw from the experience. The talk will be given on the basis of https://github.com/Daniel-Mietchen/events/blob/master/FORCE-2018-research-published-last-week.md.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Mietchen

Daniel Mietchen

Researcher/Scholar/Scientist, Data Science Institute, University of Virginia
- Integrating research workflows with the Web - Engaging the research community and the public with open research workflows - Using open research workflows in educational contexts


Wednesday October 10, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
Classroom LB-207, Webster Library, Concordia University Pavillion J.W. McConnell Bldg, 1400 Maisonneuve Blvd W, Montreal, QC H3G 1M8, Canada

9:00am

Workshop on Software Citation Implementation
All pre-conference workshops required separate registration. That registration process is now CLOSED and this workshop is full.  

This workshop will start with a short summary of the work of the Force11 Software Citation Implementation WG over the last 15 months.

We will then discuss the following topics in more detail:
a) guidance and documentation regarding software citation,
b) collecting metadata about software using codemeta and Citation File format,
c) software citation best practices for repositories,
d) software citation best practices for publishers.

The intended audience for the workshop is anyone interested in software citation in general, and one of the four topics listed above in particular. At the end of the workshop we want all participants to have a better understanding of the current state of software citation, the additional work that is needed to better implement software citation into standard scholarly practices, and the specific work that each participant can do to help with software citation implementation.

We will use the Implementing Software Citation session in the main Force2018 program to report on the outcomes of the workshop for those unable to attend.

Please note that this workshop will be held at Hôtel Delta Montréal's Vivaldi Room


Speakers
avatar for Martin Fenner

Martin Fenner

Technical Director, DataCite
avatar for Neil P. Chue Hong

Neil P. Chue Hong

Director, Software Sustainability Institute
avatar for Daniel S. Katz

Daniel S. Katz

Assistant Dir. for Scientific Software & Applications, NCSA; Research Assoc. Prof., CS, ECE, iSchool, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign


Wednesday October 10, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
Delta Hotel - Vivaldi Room 475 Avenue du Président-Kennedy, Montréal, QC H3A 1J7, Canada

10:00am

Better Metadata: How Metadata 2020 is working to help organizations invest in the connections between research
All pre-conference workshops required separate registration. That registration process is now CLOSED and this workshop is full.  

We will engage attendees with a discussion surrounding existing metadata evaluation tools and guidance; and imagine improvements and/or new processes. Together we will reimagine an ideal evaluation workflow for multiple communities, the results from which will incentivize metadata improvements needed to accelerate research discovery. How can we effectively connect mappings between metadata recommendations and elements to metadata evaluation tools and guidance? We will use our previously collected community recommendations and metadata collections as input and show our results.

We will present Metadata 2020's progress to date on gathering use cases and business information to clearly demonstrate these principles; and bring attendees on board to discuss how to maximize engagement with these messages throughout the scholarly communications community. We aim to work directly with participants as metadata evangelists, inspiring them to spread the word to their own scholarly communications communities. This discussion will be communications-focused; ‘researcher communications’ surrounding metadata challenges; and also driven by demonstrating incentives for organizations (publishers; librarians; service, platform and tool providers; and data publishers and repositories) to improve metadata.

Speakers
avatar for Ted Habermann

Ted Habermann

Owner, Metadata Game Changers
I am interested in all facets of metadata needed to discover, access, use, and understand data of any kind. Also evaluation and improvement of metadata collections, translation proofing. Ask me about the Metadata Game.


Wednesday October 10, 2018 10:00am - 12:00pm
Multifunctional Room LB-322, Webster Library, Concordia University Pavillion J.W. McConnell Bldg, 1400 Maisonneuve Blvd W, Montreal, QC H3G 1M8, Canada

10:00am

Blockchain in Scholarly Communication
All pre-conference workshops required separate registration. That registration process is now CLOSED and this workshop is full.  

Blockchain in Scholarly Communication – Introduction and Overview
Speaker: Karmen Condic-Jurkic
Blockchain enthusiasts aim to disrupt academic ecosystem - from the way research gets published and cited to funding distribution, reputation management and creation of new incentives. This exciting new technology brings a promise to democratize access to research processes in various stages and to make science more open, both to researchers, investors and general public. But, many problems currently encountered in academia can't be solved simply with a use of new technology and a widespread adoption of new tools will take time and effort. Before engaging in such a large scale process, we need to think about the benefits and costs of having such technology in use, and ultimately, what do researchers really need. Join the conversation!
 
ARTiFACTS--Blockchain’s application for real-time citations and reputation building
Speakers: Courtney Morris and Dave Kochalko
ARTiFACTS will discuss how BC can help leverage reputation as an incentive for building a real-time search, discovery and research index of all research artifacts, not just published articles/pre-prints, for conducting open science.
 
The Scholarly Wallet
Speakers: Alexander Garcia Castro and Michael Conlon
Managing scholarly reputation through assertions of authorship, peer review, and other contributions to scholarly works is under development as a “scholarly wallet.”  Deployed on an open blockchain for science, and interfaced to assertion management systems such as VIVO, the scholarly wallet can potentially assure open, enduring access to the scholarly commons.


Wednesday October 10, 2018 10:00am - 12:00pm
Classroom LB-205, Webster Library, Concordia University Pavillion J.W. McConnell Bldg, 1400 Maisonneuve Blvd W, Montreal, QC H3G 1M8, Canada

10:00am

Scholarly Communication Unboxed
All pre-conference workshops are open to those registered for FORCE2018 (limited space, first come first serve).  Sign-up for workshops here.

Elsevier's 2017 acquisition of bepress shocked the library community, many of whom used bepress' institutional repository (IR) platform, and sparked questions about who owns scholarly communications infrastructure. The University of Pennsylvania Libraries responded to this news by making a public, values-based decision to embark on a learning phase to explore alternatives to bepress. This work led us to start questioning not only our own IR but also our entire scholarly communications foundation - because what is an IR, really? While most might center the conversation around library stewardship of materials, everyone's answer is different, depending on what they collect, their mission, supporting scholarly communications services they provide, etc.
 
Penn Libraries, in partnership with SPARC, is creating a new initiative, Scholarly Communications UnBoxed Activities (SCUBA), hoping to help communities start conversations about their IRs and other scholarly communications services. Participants will be asked to then share those findings with the larger schol comm community in the hopes that if we can all find a shared understanding of our scholarly communications infrastructures, we might be able to better support each other in library-owned/community-aligned endeavors.
 
This talk would present several activities to the group, asking them to have a conversation, to engage with one another in re-imagining their own infrastructures and services, and to think outside of the scholarly communications box.

Speakers
SW

Sarah Wipperman

Scholarly Communications & Digital Repository Librarian, University of Pennsylvania


12:00pm

Break for lunch (on your own)
Wednesday October 10, 2018 12:00pm - 12:30pm
TBA

12:30pm

Contributing and Consuming Data Metrics to Make Your Data Count
All pre-conference workshops required separate registration. That registration process is now CLOSED and this workshop is full.  

Make Data Count (https://www.makedatacount.org) is a project set out to elevate research data as a first class scholarly output. In the last year, DataCite, California Digital Library, and DataONE have developed an approach for repositories to process and display comparable, standardized data-level-metrics (DLMs). In addition, Make Data Count incorporates the data citations contributed through Scholix (www.scholix.org). In this session we will engage research stakeholders, specifically repositories and publishers, in a "How-To" make your data count. This will involve:

  • Repositories: how to standardize data usage metrics according to the COUNTER code of practice for research data
  • Repositories: how to display standardized data usage metrics and data citations at the repository level
  • Repositories: how to submit to a DataCite open public hub for data usage and citation metrics
  • Repositories: how to submit data citations properly in metadata
  • Publishers: why and how to tag and submit data citations to Crossref
  • Publishers: how to consume data citations through Event Data

Our intentions for this session are to engage the community on data level metrics and and equip those who join us to both adopt and promote DLMs.

Please note that this workshop will be held at Hôtel Delta Montréal's Vivaldi Room

Speakers
HC

Helena Cousijn

Director of Community Engagement & Communications, DataCIte
avatar for Daniella Lowenberg

Daniella Lowenberg

California Digital Library - CDL


Wednesday October 10, 2018 12:30pm - 3:00pm
Delta Hotel - Vivaldi Room 475 Avenue du Président-Kennedy, Montréal, QC H3A 1J7, Canada

12:30pm

CRediT: Discussing next steps
All pre-conference workshops required separate registration. That registration process is now CLOSED and this workshop is full.  

An interactive session to explore next steps for the CRediT taxonomy.  CRediT is a linked data initiative that allows author contribution(s) to scientific papers to be specified, transparent, and present in the article XML (http://docs.casrai.org/CRediT).  CRediT has been adopted by over 100 journals, yet implementations vary widely.  To further engagement with the scholarly community, and identify next steps for CRediT, this workshop will:
  • Start with an overview of CRediT and how it works, including: author, publisher, integrator perspectives; ethical issues; and barriers to adoption.  
  • Use live online polls to gather participant opinions, conduct thought experiments, and identify topics for breakout groups
  • Use Breakout Groups to identify innovations and next steps.  Topics to be determined by participants, and might include: implementation and barriers, ethical issues, usefulness, and application in non-science disciplines
  • Share results from breakout groups  (both during the workshop and after)


Speakers
avatar for Cory Craig

Cory Craig

Science & Engineering Librarian, University of California, Davis
Librarian at University of California, Davis. Interested in CRediT, ORCiD, transparency of author contributions, linked data, and metrics. Recently published a book chapter on CRediT and related efforts to make author contributions transparent and part of the scholarly record (Contributorship... Read More →
avatar for Mohammad Hosseini

Mohammad Hosseini

Dublin City University
PhD student on research ethics and integrity, and focused on the normative aspects of scientific authorship practices. | Member of the EnTIRE project, aimed at creating an online platform that makes information about Research Ethics & Research Integrity easily accessible to the research... Read More →


Wednesday October 10, 2018 12:30pm - 3:00pm
Classroom LB-207, Webster Library, Concordia University Pavillion J.W. McConnell Bldg, 1400 Maisonneuve Blvd W, Montreal, QC H3G 1M8, Canada

12:30pm

Engaging researchers in data management by focusing on reproducibility of results
All pre-conference workshops required separate registration. That registration process is now CLOSED and this workshop is full.  

Sharing data and code is increasingly required or expected of researchers and that more repository options exist for making such materials available. That’s the good news. The challenge is that self-archiving relies on researchers to make these materials archive-ready, an activity in which they might be uninterested and for which they may not be expert. Scientific reproducibility represents a convergence of the interests of both researchers and data archivists: reproducibility relies on access to independently understandable and usable research materials upon which such work can build. Engaging with researchers by encouraging reproducible research practices presents an opportunity for data professionals to inculcate data management practices. Working alongside researchers, data professionals can help shape the research lifecycle in ways that anticipate transparency. This is aligned with the mission of CuRe (Curating for Reproducibility), which aims to support curation and review of digital scholarly objects for the purpose of facilitating the digital preservation of the evidence base necessary for future understanding, evaluation, and reproducibility of scientific claims.

Speakers
TC

Thu-Mai Christian

Odum Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
LP

Limor Peer

Yale University


Wednesday October 10, 2018 12:30pm - 3:00pm
Multifunctional Room LB-322, Webster Library, Concordia University Pavillion J.W. McConnell Bldg, 1400 Maisonneuve Blvd W, Montreal, QC H3G 1M8, Canada

12:30pm

Frictionless Data: how we can all make it effortless to transport data among different tools and platforms
All pre-conference workshops required separate registration. That registration process is now CLOSED and this workshop is full.  

Getting insight from data is not always a straightforward process. Data is often hard to find, archived in difficult to use formats, poorly structured and/or incomplete. These issues create friction and make it difficult to use, publish and share data. The Frictionless Data initiative aims to reduce friction in working with data, with a goal to make it effortless to transport data among different tools and platforms for further analysis.

Speakers
avatar for Serah Njambi

Serah Njambi

Developer Advocate, Open Knowledge International
I love working with and in communities! Let's chat about all things open (open source and open data), data quality and data validation. Ask me about Kenya, too!


12:30pm

Publishing Precursors: datapubs, nanopubs, minipub, micropubs and more
All pre-conference workshops required separate registration. That registration process is now CLOSED and this workshop is full.  

Join this workshop to present ideas for non-traditional publications that precede typical preprint or journal publication. Sharing these different forms of short and rapid early may be the answer to transforming research communication and thinking outside the journal. We invite lightning talks and will address questions about how to author, produce, share and make discoverable these precursors to traditional publishing.  

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Himmelstein

Daniel Himmelstein

Data scientist, University of Pennsylvania
I am a digital craftsman in the blossoming biodata revolution. Currently, I develop a cool way to integrate open databases towards drug discoveries. My favorite color is open: CC BY for publishing, CC0 for data, Thinklab for realtime feedback, GitHub for code, Bitcoin for time & money... Read More →
avatar for Eric Lopatin

Eric Lopatin

Product Manager, Public Library of Science
avatar for David Mellor

David Mellor

Center for Open Sciene
I work with publishers, funders, and societies to implement better policies around data and materials transparency, reporting guidelines, preregistration, and replication, summarized in the Transparency and Openness Promotion Guidelines (TOP https://cos.io/top).
DR

Daniela Raciti

Micropublication.org
avatar for Kristen Ratan

Kristen Ratan

Co-founder, Coko Foundation
Kristen co-founded the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation (Coko). She has 20 years of experience developing new technology, leading strategic innovations, and building community in the publishing industry. Kristen was most recently the Publisher at the Public Library of Science (PLOS... Read More →
avatar for Daniela Saderi

Daniela Saderi

Mozilla Fellow 2018, Mozilla / PREreview
I am a Mozilla Fellow for Science 2018 and soon-to-be PhD in Neuroscience. I co-founded and co-lead with two other amazing women PREreview.org, a community and web platform for the collaborative writing of preprint reviews. I want to help bring an open and collaborative culture in... Read More →
avatar for Shelley Stall

Shelley Stall

Senior Director, Data Leadership, American Geophysical Union
Shelley Stall is the Senior Director of Data Leadership at the American Geophysical Union. Shelley has more than two decades of experience working in high-volume, complex data management environments. She has helped organizations in not-for-profit, commercial, defense, and federal... Read More →
avatar for Nikola Stikov

Nikola Stikov

University of Montreal
Nikola Stikov is Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, a researcher at the Montreal Heart Institute, and co-director of NeuroPoly, the Neuroimaging Research Laboratory at École Polytechnique, University of Montreal. His research runs the gamut of quantitative magnetic resonance... Read More →
KY

Karen Yook

ManagingEditor/Curator, microPublication.org - Caltech
Scholarly Communication Re-designer.


Wednesday October 10, 2018 12:30pm - 3:00pm
Classroom LB-205, Webster Library, Concordia University Pavillion J.W. McConnell Bldg, 1400 Maisonneuve Blvd W, Montreal, QC H3G 1M8, Canada

3:00pm

Afternoon break (on your own)
Wednesday October 10, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
TBA

3:30pm

Making Science Transparent By Default
All pre-conference workshops required separate registration. That registration process is now CLOSED and this workshop is full.  

In this workshop, participants will learn to create an open research project, disseminate findings through preprint communities, address bias in research planning, and create communities of practice to engage a wider audience through shared goals.

We will begin with an ideal end in mind: a fully open research report disseminated and improved through an open preprint platform. Backing up the assertions and discoveries from that preprint are fully open and FAIR data, analysis code, and research materials. Underlying the whole project is a persistent, preregistered analysis plan that helps to improve planning and address sources of bias in data collection and analysis. Finally, participants will plan a community-building campaign that takes advantage of our open source tools.

To prepare for the workshop, sign up for an account at https://osf.io. Materials will be provided here: https://osf.io/sfzxc/ 
About COS: The Center for Open Science is a non-profit technology and culture change company whose mission is to increase the transparency and reproducibility in scientific research. We achieve this mission through meta-science to discover barriers to reproducibility, advocacy for solutions to change norms and incentives in the scientific community, and infrastructure to enable an open research workflow, the OSF.

Speakers
avatar for David Mellor

David Mellor

Center for Open Sciene
I work with publishers, funders, and societies to implement better policies around data and materials transparency, reporting guidelines, preregistration, and replication, summarized in the Transparency and Openness Promotion Guidelines (TOP https://cos.io/top).


3:30pm

Measuring and Mapping Data Reuse: An Interactive Workshop on Metrics for Data
All pre-conference workshops required separate registration. That registration process is now CLOSED and this workshop is full.  

Though researchers are increasingly sharing their data, and both funders and publishers have adopted policies requiring data sharing, little work has been done to determine what actually happens to shared data. Are they being reused, and if so, by whom and for what purpose? Knowing how, why, and to what extent datasets are reused could inform curation decisions and help reward researchers who share high value datasets. While data citation provides a potential mechanism for tracking data reuse, the uptake of data citation has thus far been relatively low, and systems do not yet exist to easily track data citations. This workshop will provide an overview of some of the existing challenges in characterizing data reuse, as well as engage attendees in brainstorming potential solutions that research communities could adopt to facilitate measuring and mapping data reuse.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Federer

Lisa Federer

Data Science and Open Science Librarian, NIH


Wednesday October 10, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Multifunctional Room LB-322, Webster Library, Concordia University Pavillion J.W. McConnell Bldg, 1400 Maisonneuve Blvd W, Montreal, QC H3G 1M8, Canada

3:30pm

OA Book Metrics Roundtable
Springer Nature is hosting a roundtable at the pre-conference workshop for FORCE2018 in Montreal on 10 October, to discuss metrics for open access books.  The registration page is here:           https://www.springernature.com/gp/open-research/journals-books/books/force2018

The roundtable is open to any attendees of the FORCE2018 conference who are book authors and librarians - preferably with open access experience. We have also invited a Canadian-based publisher and a metrics expert. Agata Morka, Senior Manager for open access books, will be chairing the roundtable discussion, which will look at:

-Why does measurement matter?
-How are OA book authors measuring the impact of their work?
-What are the main challenges in getting access to information on OA book metrics?
-How and why should publishers encourage increased engagement with OA book metrics?

Register for this workshop here: https://www.springernature.com/gp/open-research/journals-books/books/force2018

Please note that this workshop will be held at Hôtel Delta Montréal's Vivaldi Room

Speakers
AM

Agata Morka

Springer Nature


Wednesday October 10, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Delta Hotel - Vivaldi Room 475 Avenue du Président-Kennedy, Montréal, QC H3A 1J7, Canada

3:30pm

Our Community Is Moving a Mountain: Open and FAIR Data in the Earth, Space, and Environmental Sciences
All pre-conference workshops required separate registration. That registration process is now CLOSED and this workshop is full.  

Different stakeholders, different motivations, different funding models, with one common goal that scientific advancement requires well-documented, and easily discoverable data (and other research objects) that are reusable.  The Earth, space and environmental sciences (ESES) has established a coalition of journals, repositories and infrastructure convened by the American Geophysical Union (AGU) to develop common practices and policies that ensure data supporting a publication meets this common goal of data reusability.

This project is focused on using existing, proven guidance from communities such as FORCE11 to adopt across an entire domain.  In this session we will provide an overview of how FORCE11’s recommendations provided solutions to the ESES community, how we developed our Commitment Statement and Implementation Guidelines, the challenges we had to overcome to stay on target, and our plans for implementation internationally.  

Speakers
avatar for Shelley Stall

Shelley Stall

Senior Director, Data Leadership, American Geophysical Union
Shelley Stall is the Senior Director of Data Leadership at the American Geophysical Union. Shelley has more than two decades of experience working in high-volume, complex data management environments. She has helped organizations in not-for-profit, commercial, defense, and federal... Read More →


Wednesday October 10, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Classroom LB-205, Webster Library, Concordia University Pavillion J.W. McConnell Bldg, 1400 Maisonneuve Blvd W, Montreal, QC H3G 1M8, Canada
 
Thursday, October 11
 

9:00am

Opening and Introductions
Speakers
avatar for FORCE2018 organizers

FORCE2018 organizers

FORCE2018 Organizers: visit our website for a full list of organizers. 


Thursday October 11, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

9:30am

Applying Wittgenstein in Scholarly Communication: A Framework to Overcome the Challenges of Transdisciplinary Communication
We might want to engage with fellow researchers and students, but learning special vocabulary and language of another field can be a daunting task. In times of ever accelerating technological progress, scholarly communication is facing the challenge of reconciling increasingly specialized research programs and practices with the demand for interdisciplinary communication.

In this talk, I want to address the gap between theory and practice in a playful way by proposing a framework based on Wittgenstein's philosophy, contemporary cognitive science, and schol-comm technology. The main question that I want to explore is: "How can the theory help to design and build technology for scholarly communications which overcomes the challenges of transdisciplinary communication?" I will briefly introduce these concepts, provide some background for the philosophical ideas, and finally show how these relate to an actual piece of working scholarly communications software, viz., Open Knowledge Maps.

This framework provides tools to conceptualize scholarly communication and technology in a way that includes the individual cognitive and broader social dimension of communication.

COI: I am part of the non-profit OKM (openknowledgemaps.org). The draft of this paper is available on Authorea (https://www.authorea.com/210697/Y1Etz_Zx39cR7MUjcSgoUg)

Speakers
avatar for Asura Enkhbayar

Asura Enkhbayar

Simon Fraser University


Thursday October 11, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Room C13, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

9:30am

Community supported open data infrastructure - Dryad and CDL's plans for accelerating data publishing
Signs are indicating that the commercial world will soon take over the open data space. Innovation is required both in the workflows for data publishing as well as in sustainability plans for data repositories. Dryad and California Digital Library are partnering to provide an open-source and affordable service focused on global institutional membership, seamless publisher integrations, and community (institution, publisher, researcher, curator) buy-in for open data publishing. This session will be focused on a discussion with all research stakeholders present to gather needs, values, and priorities that would lend to a higher adoption rate of curated and published data. Our intention is to engage the community in a way that will lead to a community supported platform and service.

Speakers
avatar for Daniella Lowenberg

Daniella Lowenberg

California Digital Library - CDL


Thursday October 11, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

9:30am

Giving credit where it is due: how to make more meaningful connections between people, their roles, their work and impacts.
Better recognition and reward for a full range of contributions of varying types and intensities are necessary to move science forward. Unfortunately, little infrastructure exists to identify, aggregate, present, and (ultimately) assess the impact of the hundreds of contributions made each day by a diverse research workforce. These significant problems are technical as well as social. Here we will describe approaches to address these issues, including data models to better represent contributor roles and the full array of research outputs, as well as opportunities and challenges related to the cultural aspects of incorporating these tools into traditional academic workflows. Finally, we'll apply these tools to real-life examples described in social media and elsewhere to illustrate the frustrations, the strains on the system, the lack of credit to underrepresented voices in research, and to empower real solutions. 

Speakers
avatar for Kristi Holmes

Kristi Holmes

Director, Northwestern University / CD2H
Kristi is the director of Galter Health Sciences Library & Learning Center and associate professor of Preventive Medicine (Health & Biomedical Informatics) at Northwestern University. Her research is focused on the development and application of information standards to support interoperability... Read More →


Thursday October 11, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Room C14, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

10:00am

A decentralized scholarly commons
Today’s scholarly research outputs (data, publications, and other digital objects) are stored and accessed via a centralized Web-based infrastructure. Those who control infrastructure and platforms also control content preservation, storage, and access. Centralization has shaped the discovery, access, and reuse of scholarly outputs. Issues such as link rot and inadequate documentation hinder scholarly work. Meanwhile, privatization of online scholarly resources has lead to global inequality in information access, as private web-based services inherently prioritize those with the resources to pay for access. Decentralization introduces a new model for how data are stored, shared, and accessed. Decentralized models require the engagement of network participants and have the potential to create a sustainable scholarly commons. We are collaborating with California Digital Library and the Internet Archive to add decentralized properties to their existing data preservation systems. Our shared goal is to spread redundant verified copies of data across many institutions, ensuring open access and reducing long-term costs for libraries. We envision this network as a key step in the cultural repositioning of open knowledge as a commons. It’s time to ask whether traditional, centralized Web architecture aligns with scholarly priorities and values, and to collaboratively move towards new approaches that do.

Speakers
DR

Danielle Robinson

Code for Science & Society


Thursday October 11, 2018 10:00am - 10:30am
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

10:00am

Could Open Be the Yellow Brick Road to Innovation in Genomics in North America?
Medical research in genomics advances at an accelerated pace. Every new discovery or invention creates a new and even more ambitious set of promises and associated expectations for improved healthcare. However, most of these promises are still to come to full fruition. Proponents of the patent system and its traditional proprietary model of commercialization claim that patents are the most effective instrument for providing the necessary incentives to allocate resources and efforts to advance innovation. However, the use of patents in genomics introduces major roadblocks leading to a slower, less efficient, and more burdensome innovation process. Moreover, patented innovation tends to be particularly costly contributing to the recent price rise of drugs, tests and medical devices. These high prices prevent poorer populations from obtaining the healthcare services they need. In order to create an improved innovation system in this field, a variety of open models of innovation have been proposed and used in addition to, or to replace, the patent system. In my presentation, I (and I call the audience to do it as well) consider whether open models of collaboration can pave a yellow brick road to future innovation. In order to do this, I present two projects in North America that have in fact adopted one or more open models of collaboration: Structural Genomics Consortium and Sage Bionetworks. I then open the discussion to determine to what extent can these models help advance innovation in genomics and where do they come short.

Speakers
avatar for Palmira Granados Moreno

Palmira Granados Moreno

Academic Associate, McGill University


Thursday October 11, 2018 10:00am - 10:30am
Room C13, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

10:00am

Public Access Submission System (PASS)
Johns Hopkins University, Harvard University, MIT, and 221B are developing the Public Access Submission System (PASS) which will support compliance with US funding agencies' public access policies and institutional open access policies. By combining workflows between the two compliance pathways, PASS facilitates simultaneous submission into funder repositories (e.g., PubMedCentral) and institutional repositories. We intend to integrate a data archive such that researchers can submit articles and data at the same time. This talk will engage the audience by offering a demonstration of PASS in action and by outlining the steps by which we have engaged the university's central administration (including the President's office) to provide funding and sponsorship for PASS and engaged US funding agencies who have offered access to APIs, etc. Further information about PASS is available at https://osf.io/8qfzj/

Speakers
avatar for Sayeed Choudhury

Sayeed Choudhury

Associate Dean, Johns Hopkins University


Thursday October 11, 2018 10:00am - 10:30am
Room C14, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

10:30am

Morning break
Time to grab coffee/tea, network, and look at posters

Thursday October 11, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

10:30am

Poster session
Take a look at posters:  Final List.


Thursday October 11, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

11:00am

Classifying Knowledge to Democratise Innovation
Is Open Access/Open Knowledge levelling the playing field in terms of innovation and discovery? Or is Open Access developing the competitive advantage of Artificial Intelligence-powered invention machines?
Durham Zoo is a project to engage the community to build a search-and-innovation engine for science and technology. The crowdsourced human classification of concepts, an expression of Collective Intelligence, would be supplemented with AI.
The classification information would not be Open Access; however individuals could access the resource to search the ‘prior art’ or look for a novel solution to their problem.
Targeted advertising could generate revenue to pay for the development of the system and be fed back to the community via research into climate-change mitigation technologies, the search for new antibiotics, or whatever the community so desires.

Speakers

Thursday October 11, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Room C13, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

11:00am

How atomizing research updates makes publishing the most exciting part of the research life cycle.
Whether you're diving to measure coral reefs in Tahiti or hunched over a computer running statistical analyses, participating in scientific research can be one of the most fun and challenging experiences in the world. The one part we all dread, though, comes after the excitement of a new discovery fades - when we have to sit down and spend the next few months (or years!) publishing a manuscript. Part of what makes this process so aggravating is that far too often it brings out the worst in us - the politics, getting scooped, pressure to over-interpret results, and hiding those really annoying results deep in the supplemental figures. Most if not all of these issues arise from a single source -trying to spin our own small set of results into a really good story. Atomizing research updates into "micro-publications" relieves these conflicts and lets us speak freely about what's actually going on - the good, the bad, and even the mundane. Most importantly, in aggregate micro-publications let us tell the most engaging research stories of all- the ones that involve the whole community, are reproducible, and will stand the test of time. But don't take my word for it, come see for yourself with an interactive game that pits slow, long form individual narratives against short, community driven narratives!

Conflicts of interest: I'm founder and CEO of a startup company that is building micro-publishing services for basic scientists. I am not planning to speak specifically about our product, but rather focusing on the underlying motivation for why I'm doing what I'm doing :).

Speakers

Thursday October 11, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Room C14, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

11:00am

Towards a Frictionless Data Future
For a while now, there have been calls in the open data community for data publishers to improve the quality of data they publish. These calls have focussed efforts on answering 'Why better data quality matters'. 'Towards a Frictionless Data Future' talk is designed to go a step further and answer the 'How to publish higher quality data'. The aim of this session is to paint a picture of issues users face in working with data, and evoke data publishers to think about ways to improve the quality of the data they publish. The talk culminates with the introduction of the Frictionless Data Field Guide (http://frictionlessdata.io/field-guide/), which hand-holds data publishers on using Frictionless Data tools to improve data quality and as part of their data publishing workflows. I foresee no conflicts of interest.

Speakers
avatar for Serah Njambi

Serah Njambi

Developer Advocate, Open Knowledge International
I love working with and in communities! Let's chat about all things open (open source and open data), data quality and data validation. Ask me about Kenya, too!


Thursday October 11, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

11:30am

Beyond APCs: the Partnership Model
At the 2018 UKSG Conference in Glasgow, Liam Earney, the Director of Jisc Collections, questioned the extent of progress of the OA transition in the UK as well as its impacts. He showed some eloquent numbers regarding the sustainability of the Gold model with APC: “[a]verage APC increased in cost by 16% from 2013 to 2016”. Moreover, “70% of UK OA articles are published in hybrid journals, yet subscription expenditure has continued to grow”. Far from being a solution to the infamous periodicals crisis that relentlessly eats away at libraries’ acquisition budgets, open access funding based on the author-pays model – largely picked up by commercial publishers – appears to have had the opposite effect of adding to the problem. In order to deal with this situation, a third approach must be found to ensure fair funding for journals in open access, as well as increased participation of stakeholders in the scholarly publication field to the administration of non-commercial research dissemination infrastructures. This is what Érudit and the Canadian Research Knowledge Network have achieved, by developing a partnership model in support of open access, and which is now part of Coalition Publi.ca. This presentation will provide an overview of the current editorial offering in the open access sector and address the impacts of its development. It will then focus on the Coalition Publi.ca initiative and how its full implementation is tide to by a renewed engagement of the scholarly community in the publishing ecosystem.

Speakers
avatar for Emilie Paquin

Emilie Paquin

Director Research & Strategic Development, erudit.org


Thursday October 11, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Room C14, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

11:30am

Exploring Data Citation in Crossref and DataCite's Event Data service
For the past several years data citation has been an important topic in the research community. This paper seeks to address two questions related to this topic: 1) How data citation has grown over the last several years, and 2) What are the limitations of using the Crossref and DataCite's Event Data service as a source of data citation analyses. Event Data is a collaborative service of Crossref and DataCite that retrieves and exposes the activity that occurs around research (publications, research, software, etc.). In this work, we performed an exploratory analysis of data citation dataset collected via Crossref and DataCite's Event Data service. We analyzed data that used the preferred method for data citation according to the Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles. Additionally, we examined records downloaded from the Crossref and DataCite's Event Data service and developed a series of recommendations regarding the use of this source for data citation analyses. The analysis shows that data citation is growing at a slow pace. Furthermore, we found data citation differences between publishers and data centers. We identify limitations in terms of identifying the types of relationship between datasets and publications. We anticipate that this will that help identify early patterns of data citation. We also expect that this work would lay the groundwork for future analysis of data citation using the Crossref and DataCite’s Event Data and DataCite services.

Speakers
KG

Kristian Garza

DataCite e.V.


Thursday October 11, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

11:30am

Open Science Policies: Beyond the policy-making process
The National Council for Science and Technology (CONACYT) is the main founding institution for Mexican research activities. In 2017 Mexico, through CONACYT, became the first country enacting an Open Science Policy. Even when it can be considered as a remarkable milestone, I have seen many other challenges to tackle. During this session I would like to take 10 minutes to share my experience designing and implementing this mentioned policy and what I consider are the main elements to take into account like technical barriers, user's experience, political change, among others. I will attempt to answer at least 3 questions: How open science policies should look like?, Why research communities are the most significant variable in this equation? and Which are the toughest incentives to re-shape within this community? At the end of this exercise, I would like to encourage a 10 minutes discussion with the participants in order to retrieve new challenging questions arising from different fields of expertise and perspectives. Most of all, I wish to revisit concerns about open research data, the so far least developed area. The session notes could be considered as a recommendation list to draft open science policies.

Speakers
avatar for Eunice Mercado-Lara

Eunice Mercado-Lara

Science and Technology Policy Deputy Director, National Council for Science and Technology
Eunice holds a major in International Relations and master studies in International Development. Her first approach to Open was in 2013, while collaborating as Visitor Research Associate within the AidData Research Lab from The William and Mary College. There she got familiar with... Read More →


Thursday October 11, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Room C13, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

12:00pm

Engaging the Community in Support to Fair Open Access
In 1998, the Presses de l’Université de Montréal launched a pilot project aiming to ensure scholarly journals’ transition to digital format. Erudit.org, a platform dedicated to research production and dissemination, was born out of this local initiative and remains, to this day, the only Canadian platform in the humanities and social sciences, providing access to over 160 journals, 97% of which are available in open access. Registering over 23 million yearly page views, Érudit has recently strengthened its strategic partnership with the Public Knowledge Project in order to develop a comprehensive offering of editorial services. Together, they have created Coalition Publi.ca, a pan-Canadian alliance uniting stakeholders from the field of scholarly publishing - research libraries, acquisition consortia as well as universities - to promote open access and open science. Érudit and PKP are collaborating through Coalition Publi.ca to implement a fair funding model for open access and to develop research activities, as well as an open and community-managed technological infrastructure.

Speakers
avatar for Tanja Niemann

Tanja Niemann

Executive Director, Consortium ERUDIT
Open Access Infrastructure - Journal Publishing - Open Access in Canada


Thursday October 11, 2018 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Room C14, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

12:00pm

Putting Our Money Where Our Mouth Is: How Faculty Can Articulate Open Principles for Universities to Leverage During Publisher Negotiations
Faculty at the University of California (UC) have endorsed a set of 18 principles that they propose be taken into account when UC engages in its upcoming and future journal license negotiations with commercial publishers. These broad-ranging principles were devised with input from various stakeholders across UC and at other like-minded academic institutions. They are intended to help restore the balance of power in the publishing system and give researchers control over the fruits of their own labor. By endorsing these 18 principles, faculty intend to 1) signal their collective commitment to advance the public mission of UC; 2) accelerate their ongoing effort to make the products of UC research and scholarship as freely and widely available as possible through open access; and 3) leverage faculty backing to ensure that UC spends taxpayer money in the most ethically, morally, and socially-responsible way when entering into agreements with publishers. Faculty expect that these principles will lead UC to push for terms and conditions in publisher agreements that are transformative and closely aligned with the goal of making scholarly communication more fair, transparent, sustainable, and open.

Speakers
RS

Rich Schneider

University of California San Francisco


Thursday October 11, 2018 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

12:00pm

Wikidata, Wikibase, and a federated ecosystem of structured knowledge for open science
Over the past several years, interest in leveraging Wikidata as an open knowledge base has been growing in areas ranging from cultural heritage institutions and libraries to research and technology organizations. With its inherent multilinguality, human-editable interface, community-driven approach to data modeling and curation, systemic connection to Wikipedia and sister projects and alignment with the FAIR Principles for sharing data, there is an emerging consensus that Wikidata represents a significant step for turning Linked Open Data into a practical and useful technology. It provides a bridge between the many siloed knowledge bases that have emerged in the more than two decades since Tim Berners-Lee first proposed the notion of the semantic web. Despite this growing interest, there is still a fundamental lack of understanding of what Wikidata's strengths and weaknesses are, or those of Wikibase —the engine behind Wikidata. While experiments have been proliferating with the use of Wikibase, it is still very much an open question how to create a sustainable, federated ecosystem of knowledge bases to support open research, and what the social, technical, institutional barriers are towards this vision . We would like to use this session as an opportunity to identify and discuss user stories from researchers and practitioners working on open research infrastructure and understand what a model could be to get more groups onboard to design a possible path towards this vision.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Mietchen

Daniel Mietchen

Researcher/Scholar/Scientist, Data Science Institute, University of Virginia
- Integrating research workflows with the Web - Engaging the research community and the public with open research workflows - Using open research workflows in educational contexts
avatar for Dario Taraborelli

Dario Taraborelli

Director of Research, Wikimedia Foundation
Dario is a social computing researcher and open knowledge advocate based in San Francisco. He is the Director, Head of Research at the Wikimedia Foundation, the non-profit organization that operates Wikipedia and its sister projects. His research interests focus on online collaboration... Read More →


Thursday October 11, 2018 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Room C13, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

12:30pm

Lunch
Thursday October 11, 2018 12:30pm - 1:15pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

1:15pm

Power Pitch. Poster presentations

Thursday October 11, 2018 1:15pm - 2:00pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

2:00pm

A look at public engagement, publication outputs and metrics in the tenure review process
After revising the policy guidelines that inform the tenure review process in 129 institutions of higher education across the United States and Canada, an interdisciplinary team of researchers asked this question: Are we serving the public, or are we serving ourselves? Our ongoing research project revised 864 documents and forms that guide the promotion, tenure and review process in several Canadian and American institutions to identify the mentions to public and community engagement in research and scholarly work. We found that, although there are high levels of broad interest in public and community engagement in scholarship, such an interest is not precisely aligned with the specific scholarly outputs required from faculty, and the metrics for evaluating publication impact. Thus we would like to discuss with the academic community: How should we transform these guidelines, and the overall tenure review process, to ensure that public and community engagement in scholarship becomes a more meaningful requirement in faculty promotion and evaluation?

Speakers
avatar for Erin McKiernan

Erin McKiernan

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México


Thursday October 11, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

2:00pm

Gettin' Real at the FAIRground: Applying FAIR Principles to the eagle-i Research Resource Discovery Tool
Everyone knows about FAIR. But has anyone done FAIR? What does it mean to evaluate a distributed discovery tool containing research resources via the FAIR principles? Released in 2010, eagle-i (www.eagle-i.net) is an open, accessible discovery network of people, core facilities and research materials composed of an RDF framework, downloadable ontology/platform, public SPARQL interface, and an API. I will report on my attempts to:
1. Evaluate the ontology on how well it supports Findability within the disciplinary standards of bioinformatics and translational research;
2. Evaluate the eagle-i communications protocols and infrastructure for Accessibility;
3. Determine if the eagle-i ontology allows enough Interoperability for researchers to incorporate eagle-I resources into their scholcomm efforts
4. Develop metrics for our metadata to determine if it contains sufficient attributes and provenance to allow for Reuse.

Will I escape the funhouse and avoid being ambushed by a clown posse? The FAIRness of eagle-I will be revealed!

Speakers
avatar for Juliane Schneider

Juliane Schneider

Lead Data Curator, Harvard Catalyst | Clinical and Translational Science Center
Generally harmless.


Thursday October 11, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Room C13, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

2:00pm

Reproducibility on a Platter
In this talk I will introduce the reproducibility initiative of the Canadian Open Neuroscience Platform (www.conp.ca). CONP offers a flexible and reproducible approach to publishing academic research, combining transparency, data curation and code sharing to create the reproducible paper of the future. Our main goal is to share analyses in a way that lets readers replicate key figures from a journal article, as well as modify the code of the analyses to explore the impact of arbitrary parameters on those figures. To make it easier to re-run a research analysis, CONP integrates containers, data queries and Jupyter notebooks. Instead of acting as a replacement to traditional journal publishing, the CONP initiative will produce a complementary publication focused on analytical reproducibility and sharing. For each study published through CONP, our team will work with the authors to select elements of the study that capture the most important results and facilitate reproduction and exploration by reviewers and readers. We envision that our pipelines will become the standard in peer-review and remove the overhead that comes with accessing other lab’s data and running their analysis code.

Speakers
avatar for Nikola Stikov

Nikola Stikov

University of Montreal
Nikola Stikov is Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, a researcher at the Montreal Heart Institute, and co-director of NeuroPoly, the Neuroimaging Research Laboratory at École Polytechnique, University of Montreal. His research runs the gamut of quantitative magnetic resonance... Read More →


Thursday October 11, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Room C14, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

2:30pm

How Europe can make FAIR data a reality: An Action Plan
This talk will address the process and outputs of the European Commission’s Expert Group on FAIR-data implementation, which builds on the FAIR principles first articulated via Force11 (https://www.force11.org/fairprinciples). It will pay particular attention to how the report that emerged from the EC group’s work was built on consultation and engagement across geographies, sectors and domains. Significantly, the report takes a holistic, systemic approach and provides a comprehensive action plan engaging a wide range of stakeholders. The presentation will address therefore how the action plan highlights the importance of engaging with disciplinary actors, member states and their networks, as well as the fundamental role of direct researcher engagement relating to the potential for FAIR-data uptake. It will also point to how researchers and data stewards can draw on well developed disciplinary practices to engage across disciplinary boundaries. Format-wise, the presentation will use sli.do or similar to poll attendees on recommended actions and best stakeholder groups to target for successful implementation, and may solicit comparisons across geographies or sectors. The intention is to keep the audience actively involved throughout the presentation, instead of leaving the interaction to the end.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Mietchen

Daniel Mietchen

Researcher/Scholar/Scientist, Data Science Institute, University of Virginia
- Integrating research workflows with the Web - Engaging the research community and the public with open research workflows - Using open research workflows in educational contexts


Thursday October 11, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Room C14, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

2:30pm

On the positive side: workflows supported by commons-compliant tools & platforms
What could a fully commons-compliant workflow look like? Many changes currently sweeping through scholarly communication as well as those proposed by the avant garde in various stakeholder groups focus on openness, efficiency and equity. For such changes to take effect researchers and other stakeholders need to be aware, able and incentivized. A crucial condition here is that desired practices are supported by compliant tools and platforms throughout the research workflow. Those tools and platforms should be compliant with frameworks setting criteria for open, efficient and equitable infrastructures. This session uses two of those frameworks (The FORCE11 scholarly commons principles and the Principles for Open Scholarly Infrastructures) to present an example set of compliant tools and platforms that can be recognized as realistic and useful. The selection of that set reflects two years of discussions, workshops and webinars. It is not the one and final answer though. It is intended to spark further discussion as much as to be put to immediate use. In a discussion we will determine potential uses of such a compliant workflow examples, explore the borders and greyness in compliance checking and gauge the importance of interoperability, discipline specificity and any gaps remaining. We plan to use an accompanying interactive poster to collect and present input from participants during the conference.

This presentation reflects the collaborative work of the scholarly commons working group.

Speakers
avatar for Jeroen Bosman

Jeroen Bosman

Scholarly Communications Librarian, Utrecht University
Talk to me about what's on your mind ;-) You can ask me anything about Open Science, the 101 Innovations in scholarly communications survey and project, research tools, the Force11 scholarly commons working group and of course photography, cycling and the absurd.
avatar for Bianca Kramer

Bianca Kramer

Utrecht University
Making scholarly communication truly open and participatory is not (just) about agreeing on definitions. It's about people and practices, about providing good infrastructure to carry out and disseminate research, and supporting people in the choices they make as they shape their... Read More →


Thursday October 11, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

2:30pm

The Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium (NPRC): Reconfiguring the publication workflow in neuroscience
In this presentation, we provide an overview of the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium (NPRC), one of the earliest attempts in biomedicine to address systemic problems in the publication workflow. The NPRC is hosted by INCF, the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility (incf.org), an international organization that serves as a forum for coordinating digital neuroscience, particularly neuroscience infrastructure, across international borders. The NPRC was conceived at a Society for Neuroscience (sfn.org) -sponsored workshop held in 2007, Pubmed Plus: New Directions in Publishing and Data Mining, that focused on future opportunities for publishing in neuroscience, particularly for linking journals and data. The NPRC recognized that the current system of competing for limited space in top journals led to inefficiencies in publishing and an overstretched pool of reviewers. More than a dozen journals came together and agreed to share peer reviews across journals, regardless of the publisher. The NPRC has been running since 2008 and currently lists 24 journals.

During this time, there have been significant changes in the publishing landscape, e.g., the rise of “sound science” journals like PLoS One, ORCIDs, data journals, data citation and most recently, a change in attitude towards pre-print services in biomedicine. The NPRC was one of the first groups to reimagine how the publication workflow could work, and took some sensible steps to do so. It has been operating at a sustained but modest level, in part because of some of the technological and sociological barriers to transferring reviews in our current systems. But over time, members of this consortium have started to recognized that we could go much further.

In addition to streamlining the process of peer review, and re-imagining the publication workflow, the community would benefit immensely from an agreement across the many neuroscience journals to establish the standards by which both data and code are communicated across the community and reviewed. NPRC can therefore act as a forum and a decision body based on consensus to harmonize some of the practices in the field. The social process used to choose, establish and enforce these best practices would follow the INCF transparency and consensus building principles.

This talk will engage the audience to consider the future of the NPRC network and the need for cohesive actions led by the community across competing journals.

http://nprc.incf.org/index.php/participating-journals/
My co-authors are Maryann E. Martone, UCSD and David N. Kennedy, University of Massachusetts

Speakers
JP

Jean-Baptiste Poline

Resercher, McGill
Publication culture in research, data analsysis methods in brain imaging


Thursday October 11, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Room C13, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

3:00pm

Afternoon break
Time to grab coffee/tea, network, and look at posters

Thursday October 11, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

3:00pm

Poster session
Take a look at posters:  Final List.


Thursday October 11, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

3:30pm

Redefining roles in scholarly communication with the microPublication project
microPublications are peer-reviewed, indexed, and fully citable publications. During the submission process, microPublications capture and verify atomized data, directly depositing it into authoritative databases/knowledge repositories. We've launched the "microPublication Biology" journal as the first facet of this project with more domain-specific journals to come. This strategy represents a welcome alternative to scholarly communication, expanding both the nature of published data as well as engaging more members of the science community in the publication process. I will talk about these expanded roles and newer stakeholders in this talk.

Speakers
KY

Karen Yook

ManagingEditor/Curator, microPublication.org - Caltech
Scholarly Communication Re-designer.


Thursday October 11, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Room C14, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

3:30pm

Sharing Software Preservation Network (SPN)
The Training and Education working group of the Software Preservation Network (SPN) works to facilitate and support software curation and preservation through knowledge sharing and dissemination. This working group engages researchers, librarians, scholars, institutions, and other software preservation initiatives to produce content that brings awareness to the critical need for software preservation, the complexities of this task, and the need for disciplinary specific workflows and solutions. In this presentation members will share recent work and content from the Training and Education working highlighting the forms of webinars and in-depth interviews as a method for engaging the vast and distributed network working on and with software curation and preservation. Engaging this network is vital to establishing best practices and learning how to move forward with software curation and preservation with an eye to creating accessible archives, tools, and shared methodologies.

Speakers

Thursday October 11, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Room C13, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

3:30pm

Supporting open source requires trust: A look inside the Substance Consortium
There are increasing calls for open source infrastructure to support scholarly communications, but it hard for organizations to invest into open source projects without having some guarantees that the outcome will meet all their needs. This makes supporting open source complicated, and leads to organizations building their our own tools and, in the best of cases, sharing their software publicly. But, with a little trust and good will, the Substance Consortium is demonstrating another way forward. This presentation will describe how the Public Knowledge Project, Erudit, SciELO, and eLife have been working together, without any formal agreement, to support Substance in building the Texture editor. Representatives from each organization will discuss how they are working within their diverse institutional constraints to coordinate with the others and deliver an editor that will soon be found in thousands of journals and editorial workflows.

Speakers
avatar for Juan Pablo Alperin

Juan Pablo Alperin

Public Knowledge Project / ScholCommLab


Thursday October 11, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

4:00pm

Implementing Software Citation - an update from the FORCE11 WG
The co-chairs of the FORCE11 Software Citation Implementation Working Group will give a short update on recent work in the area, including around providing guidance on implementing the software citation principles, progress on technical implementations and tooling, and next steps. The majority of the talk will be a Q&A with directed questions to enable those new to this area to get up to speed and to identify other communities who have a stake in this work.

Speakers
avatar for Martin Fenner

Martin Fenner

Technical Director, DataCite
avatar for Neil P. Chue Hong

Neil P. Chue Hong

Director, Software Sustainability Institute
avatar for Daniel S. Katz

Daniel S. Katz

Assistant Dir. for Scientific Software & Applications, NCSA; Research Assoc. Prof., CS, ECE, iSchool, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign


Thursday October 11, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Room C14, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

4:00pm

National Digital Library of India: Democratizing Education through Digital Engagements
India has wide geographic expanse and large population, especially in the young group. To derive the demographic dividend, this young population needs to be made a knowledge enabled work force through greater dissemination of education. Though Indian Higher Education system itself happens to be one of the largest in the world, it is still almost impossible to educate this huge population without leveraging e-learning especially since the country has severe lack of quality teachers. Hence Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD), Government of India, through its National Mission Education through Information and Communication Technology (NMEICT) initiated the National Digital Library of India (NDLI: https://ndl.iitkgp.ac.in) in this perspective. The project is being executed by Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur and is targeted to democratize education. Naturally, one of the key challenges of the project is the engagement of students, teachers, academicians, and all stakeholders in this nation-wide initiative. The talk will provide an overview of the project and the various steps taken in respect of institutional partnerships and user connects.

Speakers
avatar for Partha Pratim Das

Partha Pratim Das

Professor, IIT Kharagpur


Thursday October 11, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Room C13, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

4:00pm

Supporting Research Communications: success stories in open source
Open Source Software (OSS): buzzword or badge? Or does it have material benefits to scholarly communications? In other words, can it live up to the hype as a catalyst for innovation? With OSS, anybody can view, use, modify, and distribute a project for any purpose. It supports collaboration - projects can accept code contributions from anybody in the world. It provides transparency - anyone can inspect an open source project for errors or inconsistencies. It also encourages adoption and remixing - code is extended or built off of in any manner of ways. It is a framework for instilling trust amongst the community who use and rely on it.

In scholarly communications, there are plenty of open source projects that died on the vine, just as in the larger world. There are no guarantees that applying an Open Source Software model will lead to a successful project. However, counter-examples are difficult to identify and as important to our ongoing conversations about how to create a robust and healthy scholarly ecosystem. We present three successful examples of OSS projects that spawned successful derivative projects — high-impact efforts with far larger communities served:

PLOS built Lagotto to track events around scholarly content collect and generate article-level metrics. It achieved scale once Crossref and DataCite built off of the source code to create the Event Data system, now tracking all publications - literature and data - with a DOI.

California Digital Library (CDL) built DMPTool to help researchers create data management plans that meet institutional and funder requirements. Separately, Data Curation Centre developed its own, DMPonline. The two found common ground and built a single codebase, Roadmap, which is now managed by both organizations, and is supported by developers worldwide.

Dryad Digital Repository’s underlying technology for their data repository was DSpaced-based (DryadRepo). To scale up and serve a larger population of researchers as well as support more modern and efficient data deposition and data curation, they are partnering with CDL, building from CDL’s OSS project, Dash, to power their service. The combined forces have resulted in a new OSS project, DataDryad.

Each example will be presented by a representative working on each of the original OSS projects so that they can elaborate on their real experiences (based on order above): Jennifer Lin, Carly Strasser, and John Chodacki. COI - John Chodacki is chairing the conference and Jennifer Lin is on the program committee.

Speakers
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

Director, University of California Curation Center, California Digital Library - CDL
John Chodacki is Director of the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at California Digital Library (CDL)
avatar for Jennifer Lin

Jennifer Lin

Director of Product Management, Crossref
avatar for Carly Strasser

Carly Strasser

Director of Academic Alliances & Data Strategy, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center


Thursday October 11, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

4:30pm

Learning from the enemy: building a successful open science movement from the rubble of today
We have been talking about open research for at least a decade, yet the ways that most scholars manage and communicate their work has not changed significantly. Government and institutional policies are everywhere, there are new tools and services launching every day. But we aren’t winning. To make meaningful advances towards open scholarly communication we need to operate like a large-scale political or social movement, coordinated both top down and grassroots up. We must consolidate efforts, funds, and ideas to do bigger things together. Unifying purpose, developing collective and synchronized action, and clear communication programs are the key ingredients to enacting widespread change. This talk will examine our current paths and lay out a strategy to build the scattered efforts in open research into a sweeping and successful movement.

Speakers
avatar for Kristen Ratan

Kristen Ratan

Co-founder, Coko Foundation
Kristen co-founded the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation (Coko). She has 20 years of experience developing new technology, leading strategic innovations, and building community in the publishing industry. Kristen was most recently the Publisher at the Public Library of Science (PLOS... Read More →


Thursday October 11, 2018 4:30pm - 5:15pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

5:15pm

Reception sponsored by Erudit
Reception sponsored by Erudit 

Speakers
avatar for FORCE2018 organizers

FORCE2018 organizers

FORCE2018 Organizers: visit our website for a full list of organizers. 


Thursday October 11, 2018 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

5:15pm

Poster session
Take a look at posters:  Final List.

Thursday October 11, 2018 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8
 
Friday, October 12
 

9:00am

Poster awards
Take a look at posters:  Final List.


Speakers
avatar for FORCE2018 organizers

FORCE2018 organizers

FORCE2018 Organizers: visit our website for a full list of organizers. 


Friday October 12, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

9:30am

Explain It to Me Like I Am Five Years Old: Science Outreach as a Model for Conference Presentations
Why don't we explain research to adults like we explain it to kids? University of Washington Science Explorers is a science outreach program that brings science lessons one day a week to a Seattle Elementary school. The graduate students running this program have developed a method for designing engaging and effective science lessons for students using a combination of multimedia resources and hands-on activities. My talk will explain how this structure used to engage elementary students can also be used to design scholarly talks like conference presentations. Using this method, it is possible to be more effective at grabbing an audience's attention, keeping them involved in a talk and improve their retention and appreciation for the information. To demonstrate this, I will structure this FORCE2018 talk using those methods.

Speakers
BK

Brian Katona

University of Washington


Friday October 12, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

9:30am

Open Access Journals in Latin America: a DOAJ ambassador perspective
Open Access in Latin America is the predominant publishing model because governments have committed with the diffusion of science outputs since 20th century, therefore it is publicly funded. Science policies have considered the relevance of publishing journals as one of the main strategies to spread the research results, however there are several challenges journals face in terms of infrastructure, professionalization of editors, funds, among others. This talk will provide some data on the main concerns that publishers have been discussed during my experience in workshops and meetings on DOAJ, that has committed to improve quality of journals published in the Global South.

Speakers
avatar for Ivonne Lujano

Ivonne Lujano

Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México/Directory of Open Access Journals


Friday October 12, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Room C14, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

9:30am

Open Access Memberships - Do they have a future?
Many Open Access publishers offer memberships to institutions that allow for reduced or waived APCs for affiliated researchers. One of the most common arguments in their favour is that they engage authors with the concept of OA publishing by reducing or removing hurdles. This talk aims to assess whether that purported engagement is compelling. Do authors even know about the membership options available to them? Do they ask librarians to make these arrangements? Do they offer a counterbalance to legacy offsetting deals. And are memberships a scalable solution for the future?

Speakers
avatar for Paul Tavner

Paul Tavner

Head of Partnerships, Hindawi
Paul oversees the development of Hindawi’s strategic partnerships, including the institutional membership program and publishing partnerships with Wiley and AAAS.


Friday October 12, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Room C13, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

10:00am

Git Going with LEGO: Tactile techniques for teaching text-based tools
Git is arguably an essential tool of modern scholarship and research communication. It offers robust, distributed version control and mechanisms for collaboration and sharing through online platforms such as GitHub. Yet, Git is obtuse, abstract, and a challenge to both teach and learn. Even well-designed lessons such as those offered by The Carpentries (https://carpentries.org/) put novice learners in situations of potential cognitive overload as they work to understand the processes behind fundamental commands like git init, git add, and git commit. Creating a mental model of Git's functions without assistance from tangible examples is error-prone and may result in confusion, frustration, and discouragement. Enter LEGO. Novice learners can manipulate LEGO to build their understanding of Git's functions at the same time that they are learning the commands that make these functions happen. Jamene, a Carpentries instructor, and Tami, a LEGO Serious Play facilitator (http://seriousplay.training/), will engage FORCE2018 attendees with a hands-on-your-LEGO demonstration of teaching Git with tactile materials. While playing with LEGO, we will:
•Acknowledge characteristics of text-based tools that intimidate and challenge novice learners
•Participate in the use of tactile materials for teaching and/or learning text-based tools
•Consider teaching text-based tools with tactile materials to support learners in moments when they are overwhelmed by new information

Speakers
avatar for Tami Albin

Tami Albin

Associate Librarian, University of Kansas
avatar for Jamene Brooks-Kieffer

Jamene Brooks-Kieffer

Data Services Librarian, University of Kansas


Friday October 12, 2018 10:00am - 10:30am
Room C14, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

10:00am

The harsh lessons from 4 years of community building at protocols.io
Many know that culture change in science communication is extraordinarily difficult and that the "build it and they will come" approach is doomed. So what does it take to build an engaged community from scratch? We will share the data behind the adoption of protocols.io and exactly what does and does not work for a new science communication effort.

Speakers
avatar for Lenny Teytelman

Lenny Teytelman

CEO, protocols.io


Friday October 12, 2018 10:00am - 10:30am
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

10:00am

Tools for Reproducibility and Extensibility in Scientific Research
Open inquiry through reproducing results is fundamental to the scientific process. Contemporary research relies on software engineering pipelines to collect, process, and analyze data. The open source projects within Project Jupyter facilitate these objectives by bringing software engineering within the context of scientific communication. I will highlight specific projects that are computational building blocks for scientific communication, starting with the Jupyter Notebook. I will also explore applications of projects that build off of the Notebook such as Binder, JupyterHub, and repo2docker. I will discuss how these projects can individually and jointly improve reproducibility in scientific communication. Finally, I will demonstrate applications of Jupyter software that allow researchers to build upon the code of other scientists, both to extend their work and the work of others.

Speakers
JF

Jessica Forde

Project Jupyter


Friday October 12, 2018 10:00am - 10:30am
Room C13, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

10:30am

Morning break
Time to grab coffee/tea, network, and look at posters

Friday October 12, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

11:00am

From team science to team dissemination: helping researchers collaborate for outreach and impact
The positive impact of collaboration on academic performance is well documented. Hence the rise of “team science”, helping bridge specialties and focus efforts. Taking a similarly collaborative approach to dissemination of research can further increase reach and impact – helping researchers expand and transcend their networks, benefit from each others’ skills and capabilities, reduce time and effort by sharing tasks and providing incentives and recognition to encourage individual participation in support of group outreach and impact goals. We are currently undertaking research exploring attitudes towards collaborating for dissemination and impact; we propose to present highlights from the results, and outline proposed mechanisms for supporting and encouraging this more strategic approach to dissemination within the research community.

Speakers
avatar for Melinda Kenneway

Melinda Kenneway

Executive Director, Kudos


Friday October 12, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Room C14, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

11:00am

On Jupyter notebooks and the dissemination of information retrieval-related data pertaining to a common challenge in scholarly publishing: academic editor manuscript assignment.
Efficiently routing manuscripts to qualified academic editors is a common challenge in peer review cycles. Here we’ll look at how PLOS used information retrieval methodologies and algorithm classifiers to grade the performance of its own manuscript-to-editor matching solution, and then engaged the project’s audience through use of Jupyter notebooks to disseminate resulting data. Furthermore, as our goal was not only to evaluate an existing in-house implementation, but also to provide a consistent analysis framework to be used across potential solutions involving concept extraction, we'll discuss approaches to both of these aspects in this session.

Speakers
avatar for Eric Lopatin

Eric Lopatin

Product Manager, Public Library of Science


Friday October 12, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Room C13, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

11:00am

Open Source for Open Access: Growing a Cross-Publisher Technology Community
In mid-2017, Hindawi, eLife, and the University of California Press joined the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation (Coko), to develop shared, open-source peer review and journal software together. Over the last year, we have seen organizations of all shapes and sizes join the community, including a commercial publisher, a non-profit, a university press and a scholarly society.

We propose to bring together speakers from the Coko community to discuss how we've managed to engage with each other across company and geographic boundaries. Topics will include collaborative development, collaborative design, and community building, with examples of what's worked and what hasn't. We'll share what we've learned from the open source community outside publishing and what practices we've found work specifically for the scholarly communications domain.


Speakers

Friday October 12, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

11:30am

Active Learning Approaches to Managing Online Professional Identity
In the digital age where everyone has an online identity by default, it is critical that we teach authors, researchers, scholars and professionals to take control of their professional identity, which reflects their unique and important career contributions. This session will model an active learning instruction approach to educating students, faculty, and staff about how to effectively manage their professional identity online. This mock instruction session will demonstrate a highly interactive, hands-on structure for teaching best practices and tools that prepare participants to present themselves unambiguously, accurately, clearly, and legally in various online environments. Force2018 participants will learn to teach these concepts through active participation in the session and should come prepared with their laptops, devices, and questions.

Speakers
avatar for Jen W Green

Jen W Green

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Dartmouth College Library
Within the Scholarly Communication, Copyright and Publishing Program, Jen works with faculty, students, and staff to provide them with current information and resources that can help them share the results of their research, scholarship, teaching, and learning. She is involved in... Read More →


Friday October 12, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Room C14, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

11:30am

Defining collaboration in the (Global) Digital Humanities
Digital Humanities (DH) is often considered as an innovative and collaborative community. Collaboration is considered to be essential to DH, as one researcher can rarely have all of the humanistic and technical knowledge to work alone on a project (see, for instance, DH Commons: https://dhcommons.org/projects). DH collaboration can take many forms, for example, between technical and non-technical humanistic groups, the public who participate in crowdsourcing projects, and also with researchers across different countries. However, collaboration remains under-discussed inside the DH community and there is no consensus about what a collaborative DH project should be. This is a problem when engaging researchers from different locations in DH transnational “global” projects, as those external reserchers are rarely given funding or the credit they deserve for their participation, and their work remains, most of the times, invisible. Also, the lack of open policies in DH projects do not help to establish a continuous engagement with the different DH communities around the world. On the opposite, this kind of collaboration is intermittent and that DH knowledge is rarely disseminated locally, as many DH projects still use propietary software. I am interested in deepening in these issues in my talk, in order to work on a more global and critical DH.

Speakers
avatar for Gimena Del Rio Riande

Gimena Del Rio Riande

Researcher/Scholar/Scientist, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas


Friday October 12, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Room C13, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

11:30am

Thanks, Sci-Hub!
Finding discussion topics around open access that resonate with your campus community is often quite difficult. In general, authors can agree that academic publishing is broken, but when it comes to action involving negotiating with publishers or paying author processing charges for open access, it is a hard sell to move from talk to walk. One conversation topic, however, has been generating quite the buzz on Vanderbilt University’s campus. Sci-Hub is a crowd favorite when it comes to engaging workshop or meeting attendees, and never fails to generate lively conversation ranging from apathy regarding the website’s illegal status to absolute horror at the idea of their work ending up on the site. Sci-Hub has been the greatest discussion generator since the Science sting, and it often ends with the author recognizing that action can and should be taken to ensure readers worldwide do not have to resort to black open access simply to perform research. This talk will discuss the various angles one could use when discussing Sci-Hub and demonstrates how you can advocate for open access publishing by making Sci-Hub conversations a regular part of your engagement and outreach efforts.

Speakers
ES

Elisabeth Shook

Vanderbilt University


Friday October 12, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

12:00pm

Lunch
Friday October 12, 2018 12:00pm - 12:45pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

12:45pm

Transparency in an Age of Surveillance
This Keynote will address the challenges of understanding and defining transparency in an era of "post-truth" and ubiquitous surveillance. Focusing on our participation in social media platforms, I will provide an overview of how computational propaganda and platform politics pose threats and challenges to democratic processes. Political actors not only seek to spread disinformation but to sow confusion, anarchy, and mistrust that effectively erodes trust in media and governments. Of particular concern is how digital media propaganda, algorithms, and activism target emotions to influence public opinion, and often seek to inflame pre-existing emotional tensions surrounding racism, misogyny, homophobia, and xenophobia. The talk will invite the audience to consider the possibilities of trust given our complex media landscape.

Speakers
avatar for Megan Boler

Megan Boler

Professor, University of Toronto


Friday October 12, 2018 12:45pm - 1:30pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

1:40pm

Open access is gaining ground – it's time to talk about the infrastructure
While open access is gaining ground in national and institutional publishing policies, the question how the change to open access will happen is still unclear. Many countries have adopted large-scale journal flipping initiatives that aim to change the business model of publishers. This licensing-approach is probably one that is most likely to deliver results in the short run, yet it comes with disadvantages such as a) the exclusion of poorer players in the global research landscape, b) the reproduction of the dependence from traditional publishers, and c) the dependence from an analogue product (the academic article). The talk will therefore outline potential adverse effects of offsetting agreements and large-scale journal-flipping initiatives and discuss public infrastructure alternatives for open access publishing as well as the challenges in their adoption.

Speakers
avatar for Benedikt Fecher

Benedikt Fecher

Programme Director "Learning, Knowledge, Innovation", Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society
- Open Access infrastructures | - Societal impact (ways to measure)


Friday October 12, 2018 1:40pm - 2:10pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

1:40pm

Open Stories: Showing a Successful Open Career is Possible
Researchers see sharing their research openly as a risk. Many researchers are concerned the won’t get academic promotions, or their research will be scooped if they share it publicly. Open Stories seeks to solve that problem by gathering success stories of Open advocates and practitioners to show that a successful Open career is possible. Open Stories will re-frame the conversation from risk to communicating that an open successful career is possible. By engaging researchers who are skeptical about openness with stories of others they identity with, we can create change. This presentation will overview the status of the project, open for a discussion on how to improve the project, and overview how attendees can contribute stories whether their own during FORCE or by hosting recordings sessions when they return home after the conference.

Speakers

Friday October 12, 2018 1:40pm - 2:10pm
Room C13, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

1:40pm

Revolutionizing scholarly writing with the Manubot: a foreshadow of publishing's future
Manubot is a system for writing scholarly documents on GitHub. It aims to transform publishing to be transparent & reproducible, immediate & permissionless, versioned & automated, collaborative & open, linked & provenanced, decentralized & hackable, interactive & annotated, and free of charge. Manubot accomplishes these goals by applying the workflow from open source software to academic writing. This talk will introduce Manubot and its features. Compared to other methods for writing scholarly documents, Manubot is designed for more technical users as well as infrastructure providers. However, we hope many of Manubot's innovations — such as citation-by-identifier and end-to-end reproducibility — will be adopted more broadly. Hence, this talk should engage all conference participants by foreshadowing a future of publishing towards which we strive!

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Himmelstein

Daniel Himmelstein

Data scientist, University of Pennsylvania
I am a digital craftsman in the blossoming biodata revolution. Currently, I develop a cool way to integrate open databases towards drug discoveries. My favorite color is open: CC BY for publishing, CC0 for data, Thinklab for realtime feedback, GitHub for code, Bitcoin for time & money... Read More →


Friday October 12, 2018 1:40pm - 2:10pm
Room C14, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

2:10pm

#omg #OA #search #foreveryone #lit
This session is an inferno of engagement! We’re prioritizing audience participation, and we’ll be describing a project all about getting the whole world engaged in the peer-reviewed literature. We’ll start with audience members pairing up: one person (with a laptop) will act out a persona searching for open, comprehensible, peer-reviewed resources (personas might include a physical therapist, an amature astronamer, a schoolteacher, etc), while the other observes and takes notes. The audience will come together to highlight problems with the current search and access model. Then we’ll move into a discussion of “OpenAlex,” a newly-launched (right before FORCE), free, open-source search engine created to solve these problems. OpenAlex is built on the 17M OA resources in the Unpaywall database. It supports a search experience tailored to non-academic users, by offering a simple clean interface, search suggestions, jargon translation, multiple languages, and--most importantly--a corpus that’s 100% free to read by everyone. We’ll wrap up by working with the audience to help plan the direction of OpenAlex as it moves toward wider release.

COI Statement: OpenAlex is a free, open-source project of the nonprofit Impactstory, of which the presenters are cofounders.

Speakers
HP

Heather Piwowar

cofounder, Impactstory
avatar for Jason Priem

Jason Priem

cofounder, Impactstory


Friday October 12, 2018 2:10pm - 2:40pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

2:10pm

Citation not found: the case of shortened URLs
Alternative title: DOIs are not silver bullets.

Scholarly literature has become more than just papers. Hyperlinks are the preferred way to reference other works, including non-textual objects like datasets and software. While hyperlinks are more powerful than text-based citations, they are prone to link rot. 

Link rot is inevitable to some extent, but some practices compound the problem and cannot be mitigated without the engagement of all stakeholders. Shortened URLs, proxy URLs, vanity URLs, Sci-Hub URLs and many other non-canonical citations add an extra level of indirection that increases the risk of breaking the permanent record of science.

We are building Cobaltmetrics to set the new standard for citation tracking and foster diversity in altmetrics. The web is our corpus, and we index all URIs and identifiers as first-class citations.

Speakers
avatar for Luc Boruta

Luc Boruta

CEO, Thunken



Friday October 12, 2018 2:10pm - 2:40pm
Room C14, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

2:10pm

Diverse Perspectives: Exploring Scenarios for the Scholarly Commons
The Scholarly Commons is something many of us hope for, but understanding what it might look like offers a unique challenge. This session will function as a workshop to create and share brainstormed scenarios (or sketches) that will help us better understand what scholarly commons are all about. We will use these scenarios as entry points into deeper discussions that explore the future, open our minds, and enable us to see things we might not have noticed before. What are the assumptions? What are the pieces? What would good look like? What are the differences from today? What is actually needed? By engaging with those from different backgrounds and perspectives we aim to attain a better understanding of specific needs of diverse groups. Insights and understandings will also help inform the ongoing work of the Scholarly Commons Working Group 4, which is peering through the lenses of both technology and scholarly commoning in an effort to find, gather, or create the technology needed to support a future for research communication that meets our collective and diverse needs.

Speakers
avatar for Katie Chapman

Katie Chapman

SCWG Workgroup 4


Friday October 12, 2018 2:10pm - 2:40pm
Room C13, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

2:40pm

Afternoon break
Time to grab coffee/tea, network, and look at posters

Friday October 12, 2018 2:40pm - 3:00pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

3:00pm

A hands-on introduction to Wikidata and WikiCite
In this session we'll give a hands-on introduction to Wikidata and the creation, curation and extraction of structured data about scholarly works, authors, institutions (part of the WikiCite initiative). You'll learn about the Wikidata data model and make your first edits. You'll learn how to populate a Wikidata entry from a DOI or an ORCID and how to retrieve and visualize data in SPARQL via the Wikidata Query Service. No prior knowledge of Wikidata or Wikimedia projects is required.


Speakers
avatar for Daniel Mietchen

Daniel Mietchen

Researcher/Scholar/Scientist, Data Science Institute, University of Virginia
- Integrating research workflows with the Web - Engaging the research community and the public with open research workflows - Using open research workflows in educational contexts
avatar for Dario Taraborelli

Dario Taraborelli

Director of Research, Wikimedia Foundation
Dario is a social computing researcher and open knowledge advocate based in San Francisco. He is the Director, Head of Research at the Wikimedia Foundation, the non-profit organization that operates Wikipedia and its sister projects. His research interests focus on online collaboration... Read More →


Friday October 12, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Room C14, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

3:00pm

Book Sprints: Collaborative writing that engages scholars and their audiences
Scholarly communication regularly faces the challenge to communicate across the gap between the expertise of the subject-matter experts and that of their readers, students, other disciplines, or communities outside of academia. Collaborative writing sprints are a chance for scholars to engage their readers directly by making them co-authors in the writing process.

The Book Sprints methodology has been used for ten years to create collaborative publications; by professors, students, and learn design experts to write open textbooks; by representatives of different disciplines mapping and defining an interdisciplinary field in formation; by academics and community activists to formulate guidebooks and manifestos.

Guided by a Book Sprints facilitator, the scholars and practitioners with different backgrounds constantly check each others biases and jargon, and thus ensure a publication both reader-friendly and useful for the target audience. And because the target audience is already engaged, each contributor becomes a valuable multiplier in the dissemination of the publication. The contributors are supported by an online collaborative writing environment developed by the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation and a team of Book Sprints’ designers and copy-editors co-creating the book in a five-day sprint.

This session explores some of the learnings of the last ten years in collaborative scholarly writing and publishing.

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Rühling

Barbara Rühling

CEO, Book Sprints
Collaboration, Facilitation



Friday October 12, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

3:00pm

Social Scholarly Web
In this talk we will discuss the realisation of a social scholarly information space that is completely driven by autonomous and interoperable open Web standards. What are the effects and artefacts of such a paradigm? How is it different than the plethora of existing services and platforms? Why would a researcher-centric approach to scholarly communication be desirable? See also the https://linkedresearch.org/ initiative and the https://dokie.li/ tooling.

Slides: http://csarven.ca/presentations/social-scholarly-web/

Speakers
avatar for Sarven Capadisli

Sarven Capadisli

TIB Hannover
Linked Research, dokieli, decentralisation, personal profiles (WebID) and storages, Linked Data Notifications, Web Annotation, Solid (Social Linked Data)


Friday October 12, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Room C13, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

3:30pm

A crowdsourced initiative to compare quality of reporting between preprints and peer-reviewed articles in biomedical science
Scientific communication is evolving rapidly with new technologies, challenging long-established dogma within the publication system. The recent rise in the use of preprints in the biomedical sciences has opened up a discussion on the value and/or necessity of prepublication peer review as a quality control mechanism. Nevertheless, there is currently no empirical data on how preprints measure up to peer-reviewed articles in terms of quality to solve this debate. Although scientific quality has many dimensions, a relatively simple one to access is quality of reporting of methods and results – something that can be gauged by objective metrics and should be one of the most accessible features for improvement by peer review. With this in mind, we developed a crowdsourced initiative to compare quality of reporting between preprints and peer-reviewed articles in the life sciences. We developed and registered a protocol composed of objective questions to measure quality of reporting, and subsequently recruited evaluators within the biomedical community as volunteers to evaluate random samples of articles in bioRxiv and PubMed. We are currently working with 14 evaluators across the globe, and should have final results for our predefined sample size of 76 articles per group available in the middle of the year. This would put us in an ideal position to present the results on the FORCE2018 Meeting, with a project that is both relevant to the central interests of the FORCE11 community and to the specific theme of engaging researchers through a crowdsourced approach to solve a common problem. More information on the project can be assessed at http://asapbio.org/amaral-quality and at https://osf.io/rxqn4/.
Conflict of interest statement: I am currently an ambassador for ASAPbio, a scientist-driven non-profit organization for promoting transparency and innovation in life sciences communication.

Speakers

Friday October 12, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

3:30pm

Engaging Academia with Japan-wide Data Platforms and RDM Charter
Co-authors: Takaaki Aoki and Katsuhiko Toyama

This presentation introduces the audience with Open Science developments in Japan. First, it introduces the policy developments related to open access and Open Science in Japan, which explains the ignorance of Japanese academia on these issues. Next, the Japan-wide research data platforms to be provided to all Japanese universities by the National Institute of Informatics is introduced which aim to engage the Japanese academia by providing a data management platform to be used in active research. The importance of laying a context for research data management within the academic institution is stressed and the drafting of the “Research Data Management Charter in Academic Institutions” by AXIES, the Japanese-version of EDUCAUSE in the US, is introduced. Finally, it refers to the possibility of establishing a data sharing environment apart from commercial entities.

Speakers
avatar for Miho Funamori

Miho Funamori

Associate Professor, NII - National Institute of Informatics



Friday October 12, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Room C13, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

3:30pm

Open Data: Nice People Can't Share
One of the most meaningful ways by which scientists can engage with other scientists and with the broader community is by sharing one of their most treasured possessions: data.  Indeed, publishers and funders increasingly acknowledge the importance of data as a scientific output. As such, many journals and funders now require that scientists make their data openly accessible, both to promote transparency and to accelerate the pace of scientific discovery. To date, journal policies that mandate data sharing have successfully increased the accessibility to datasets underlying scientific publications. However, is the quality of these data sufficient to allow reuse and reanalysis? Even when journals mandate data sharing, our survey of the ecological and evolutionary literature found that 56% of open datasets were incomplete, and 64% were shared in a way that partially or entirely prevented reuse. Given the highly competitive nature of academia, authors might be wary of openly sharing their data for fear of criticism or of others benefiting from their work at their expense. As such, ‘scholarly altruism’ is often cited as a key reason for why some authors are willing to share high quality data that are complete and readily reusable. In this talk, I will discuss our latest (unpublished) work to test this hypothesis by assessing how researchers’ psychological motivations and level of cooperation in real-world situations relate to the quality of their shared datasets.

Speakers
avatar for Dominique Roche

Dominique Roche

postdoctoral researcher, University of Neuchatel


Friday October 12, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Room C14, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

4:00pm

AI and machine learning for scholarly communication: an interactive demo
AI and machine learning are generating a lot of attention at the moment - but how can we engage with these technologies and what do they mean for scholarly communication? After a short introduction to AI and machine learning we will address these questions by engaging the audience in a live interactive demonstration in which we work together to train a machine learning algorithm to work with scholarly content. Examples of AI and machine learning already being used within the scholarly ecosystem will be outlined and discussed. We will conclude by sharing areas of opportunity we see as to how we might work with these technologies, and with each other, to advance the future of scholarly communication.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Schivas

Jennifer Schivas

Head of Strategy and Industry Engagement, 67 Bricks


Friday October 12, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Room C14, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

4:00pm

Metrics Literacy: Educating Researchers and Research Support Staff Regarding Scholarly Metrics
The talk introduces the Metrics Literacy project, which aims improve the way in which researchers and research support staff (e.g., research managers, research librarians, science communicators and funding organizations) can be trained to ensure that scholarly metrics are applied and interpreted appropriately. It aims to reduce misuse of indicators, such as the impact factor and h-index, and the application of quantitative measurements in inapt contexts by developing online resources (so-called building blocks), which convey the meaning of various scholarly indicators in an easy-to-understand fashion. Building blocks are targeted at specific audiences (e.g., researchers or funders) and address one of five main questions and four fields of application (i.e., usage metrics, altmetrics, bibliometrics and technometrics) and will be distributed using the Software Carpentry framework. The project intends to improve metrics literacy in academia and inform current scientometric research about the use of scholarly metrics.

Speakers
avatar for Stefanie Haustein

Stefanie Haustein

University of Ottawa


Friday October 12, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

4:00pm

PREreview: engaging early career researchers in peer review
Although the use of preprints in the life sciences is rapidly increasing, their adoption is still far from being the standard practice in scholarly publishing. At PREreview, we want to facilitate that cultural shift where every scientist posts, reads, and engages with preprints. Furthermore, PREreview seeks to diversify peer review by supporting the community review of preprints and their integration into the traditional peer review process. As early-career researchers (ECRs), we recognized that ECRs are rarely trained in how to contribute to peer review - despite it being a key aspect of every researcher’s life - and even more rarely are they formally invited to engage in editorial peer review. During the talk, I will share our progress in building a community of ECR preprint reviewers, the stakeholders we have engaged to support and expand our mission, and our vision to facilitate the growth of a community that openly exchanges timely, and constructive feedback on emerging scientific outputs. Engagement, openness and collaboration are at the heart of PREreview and have been since day one. We hope to share this message at FORCE2018

Speakers
avatar for Monica

Monica

Leadership Team, PREreview
As 1/3 of the PREreview Leadership Team I am committed to increasing the adoption of preprints and facilitating the training of early career researchers in peer review.


Friday October 12, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Room C13, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

4:30pm

Factors affecting researchers' open access publishing practices
Over the last decade, the proportion of papers available in open access (OA) has increased tremendously, and now accounts more than half of the literature recently published. However, little is know on the factors that influence individual researchers' open access publication patterns. For instance, do we observe a gender gap in OA publishing? Are there types of institutions that lead to higher rates of OA dissemination? Are institutional and funder OA mandates associated with higher OA availability of papers? Based on more than 10 million research papers and combining Web of Science data with the Unpaywall tool, this talk will provide an overview of organisational, disciplinary and socio-demographic characteristics associated with OA publishing. It will also discuss methodological challenges associated with the compilation of such indicators, and provide policy implications for the various stakeholders.

Speakers
avatar for Vincent Larivière

Vincent Larivière

Professor, Université de Montréal
Vincent Larivière is associate professor of information science at the École de bibliothéconomie et des sciences de l'information, l’Université de Montréal, where he teaches research methods and bibliometrics. He is also the scientific director of the Érudit journal platform... Read More →


Friday October 12, 2018 4:30pm - 5:15pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8

5:15pm

Closing and Goodbyes
Speakers
avatar for FORCE2018 organizers

FORCE2018 organizers

FORCE2018 Organizers: visit our website for a full list of organizers. 


Friday October 12, 2018 5:15pm - 5:30pm
Ballroom, New Residence Hall Conference Centre, McGill University 3625 avenue du Parc Montreal, Quebec H2X 3P8